Bitcoin (BTC) statistics - Price, Blocks Count, Difficulty ...

ShipItForward: Send and receive merchandise across nations.

Use this community to ship stuff that's too expensive or too difficult to come by in your country.
[link]

BitBulls

For Reddittors that are Bullish on Bitcoin and Bullion.
[link]

If you're a country that taxes bitcoin transactions you are going to get left the fuck behind while the rest of the world advances so fast it will make you look poverty stricken by comparison.

When bitcoin is used in nano payments where people are completing a transaction for each second they use a service in real time, streaming music for a couple of hours would create 10,000 capital gains tax events that all need to be recorded logged and filed to the IRS, each one with an attached detailed analysis of the bitcoin price when you acquired it, disposed of it, and that spread for tax purposes.
Listening to music alone would accumulate to 3 million individual capital gains tax events a year.
Then there's machine to machine payments. Do software agents and bots that own bitcoin get taxed on each of the 100,000 lightning network transactions they propagate every single day?
What the actual fuck...
This is the literal equivalent of trying to tax and require strict record keeping of every single letter within every single email and message sent over the internet.
How stupid are these people..
Countries that currently have no capital gains taxes like Singapore, Dubai, Monaco, Switzerland, Malaysia, New Zealand, all allow completely unfettered frictionless use of digital currencies like bitcoin, and they will benefit tremendously with digital finance exploding in their countries making them the new financial hubs of the new digital world.
Meanwhile countries that continue to tax every single crypto transaction will stagnate and get left behind during this digital finance wave of the future.
London and New York being the center of the old world of finance have draconian licences and immense tax record keeping burdens that strangle and suffocate the use of digital finance in their jurisdictions. They might be the center of the old financial world but they are going to be the absolute backwater of the new digital financial world the way they are going.
I'm moving to a country that doesn't tax crypto. Not so I can save money, but so I can live in a city that actually has a future in the new digital economy and isn't going to stagnate into self-inflicted poverty.
submitted by slvbtc to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

10-16 17:16 - 'Transparency at Coinbase (UK authorities monitoring bitcoin transactions - more than all non US countries combined)' (blog.coinbase.com) by /u/Internet-Fair removed from /r/unitedkingdom within 32-42min

Transparency at Coinbase (UK authorities monitoring bitcoin transactions - more than all non US countries combined)
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09-28 09:25 - 'Bitcoin is a currency that started about 50 years ago . It’s a world wide and international currency / It is legal world wide It has been a means for transaction in many countries. It has a lot of it ATM all over Singapore, and oth...' by /u/fradko removed from /r/news within 28-38min

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Bitcoin is a currency that started about 50 years ago . It’s a world wide and international currency It is legal world wide It has been a means for transaction in many countries. It has a lot of it ATM all over Singapore, and other Asia countries.
Bitcoin is an online currency that can be converted to cash You can invest all your cash using bitcoin and receive it back with a massive interest. With 10% interest You can earn 500$ daily if you put in 50$ daily You can earn 100$ on each trade
Which means you can earn daily If you decide to trade daily
It is the safest of all investment because the loss is less. And the fastest to earn more because it is a trade where millions of people engage. Everything is been done online all you have to do is invest with me
'''
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No internet, no problem. Venezuela got its first bitcoin satellite node which processes transactions without internet. "Space node" was set up in the country by Anibal Garrido and the Anibal Cripto team using technology from Blockstream

No internet, no problem. Venezuela got its first bitcoin satellite node which processes transactions without internet. submitted by acheampong64 to MyCointainerCom [link] [comments]

If you complain that Bitcoin sometimes has high transaction fees and is backed by nothing, remember: in Brazil, a country ravaged by hyperinflation, many prople use soybean sacks as money

If you complain that Bitcoin sometimes has high transaction fees and is backed by nothing, remember: in Brazil, a country ravaged by hyperinflation, many prople use soybean sacks as money submitted by ludovicoworker to btc [link] [comments]

01-07 13:12 - 'Lol 😂 / Robust / Incredible / Super / Consumes the power of countries / For 7 transactions a second' by /u/PatrickBitmain removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3-13min

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Lol 😂
Robust
Incredible
Super
Consumes the power of countries
For 7 transactions a second
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Technically is it possible to block bitcoin transaction by authority in one country

To disable the network to recognize transactions in blockchain. just curious.
submitted by dizzylight to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

02-27 19:12 - 'Get a gun, go to his home and threaten him to pay you or give BTC back. Joking, but you could contact the police or if that country is close, go to their police and show them your transaction and stuff and maybe they can help...' by /u/Scafell1 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 48-58min

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Get a gun, go to his home and threaten him to pay you or give BTC back. Joking, but you could contact the police or if that country is close, go to their police and show them your transaction and stuff and maybe they can help you.
Else just dox him.
'''
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submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

12-03 06:42 - 'Actually bitcoin cash / Because it’s usable. / Bitcoin is to expensive for these countries due to transaction fees. Bitcoin prices itself out of the reach of the poor' by /u/Shniper removed from /r/Bitcoin within 18-28min

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Actually bitcoin cash
Because it’s usable.
Bitcoin is to expensive for these countries due to transaction fees. Bitcoin prices itself out of the reach of the poor
'''
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submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

09-06 16:12 - '[quote] In foreign countries, these requirements are lower. Much, much lower than using any Bitcoin exchange, which you have to do to convert the money, so this isn't an added requirement. / [quote] No they can't. Transaction...' by /u/tmal8376592 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 0-9min

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Bitcoin run on datacenters will be demanding your ID information before you transact.
In foreign countries, these requirements are lower. Much, much lower than using any Bitcoin exchange, which you have to do to convert the money, so this isn't an added requirement.
Your transactions can be reversed, you'll be stopped from transacting with certain countries.
No they can't. Transactions can't be reversed except by a chain re-org, which has nothing to do with where your node is. How on earth are you imagining that they would stop you from transacting with ... anyone?
The datacenters can freeze your money
Uh, where did you hear this? They absolutely cannot. Just because you run a node somewhere doesn't mean you store your keys there. If anything goes wrong, you shut down service with them and spin up a node in a foreign country. SPV + light client connecting to your own node = completely trustless.
and if there's a powercut then bitcoin will stop working too.
Same with your home, except they have multiple levels of redundant power and internet?
A bitcoin that requires significant amounts of trust
There's no trust added by running your own node in a datacenter.
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Technically is it possible to block bitcoin transaction by authority in one country /r/Bitcoin

Technically is it possible to block bitcoin transaction by authority in one country /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

List of countries *not* to move to if you'd rather not have your Bitcoin transactions targeted by private corporate hackers #HackingTeam

List of countries *not* to move to if you'd rather not have your Bitcoin transactions targeted by private corporate hackers #HackingTeam submitted by benjamindees to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

Putting $400M of Bitcoin on your company balance sheet

Also posted on my blog as usual. Read it there if you can, there are footnotes and inlined plots.
A couple of months ago, MicroStrategy (MSTR) had a spare $400M of cash which it decided to shift to Bitcoin (BTC).
Today we'll discuss in excrutiating detail why this is not a good idea.
When a company has a pile of spare money it doesn't know what to do with, it'll normally do buybacks or start paying dividends. That gives the money back to the shareholders, and from an economic perspective the money can get better invested in other more promising companies. If you have a huge pile of of cash, you probably should be doing other things than leave it in a bank account to gather dust.
However, this statement from MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor exists to make it clear he's buying into BTC for all the wrong reasons:
“This is not a speculation, nor is it a hedge. This was a deliberate corporate strategy to adopt a bitcoin standard.”
Let's unpack it and jump into the economics Bitcoin:

Is Bitcoin money?

No.
Or rather BTC doesn't act as money and there's no serious future path for BTC to become a form of money. Let's go back to basics. There are 3 main economic problems money solves:
1. Medium of Exchange. Before money we had to barter, which led to the double coincidence of wants problem. When everyone accepts the same money you can buy something from someone even if they don't like the stuff you own.
As a medium of exchange, BTC is not good. There are significant transaction fees and transaction waiting times built-in to BTC and these worsen the more popular BTC get.
You can test BTC's usefulness as a medium of exchange for yourself right now: try to order a pizza or to buy a random item with BTC. How many additional hurdles do you have to go through? How many fewer options do you have than if you used a regular currency? How much overhead (time, fees) is there?
2. Unit of Account. A unit of account is what you compare the value of objects against. We denominate BTC in terms of how many USD they're worth, so BTC is a unit of account presently. We can say it's because of lack of adoption, but really it's also because the market value of BTC is so volatile.
If I buy a $1000 table today or in 2017, it's roughly a $1000 table. We can't say that a 0.4BTC table was a 0.4BTC table in 2017. We'll expand on this in the next point:
3. Store of Value. When you create economic value, you don't want to be forced to use up the value you created right away.
For instance, if I fix your washing machine and you pay me in avocados, I'd be annoyed. I'd have to consume my payment before it becomes brown, squishy and disgusting. Avocado fruit is not good money because avocadoes loses value very fast.
On the other hand, well-run currencies like the USD, GBP, CAD, EUR, etc. all lose their value at a low and most importantly fairly predictible rate. Let's look at the chart of the USD against BTC
While the dollar loses value at a predictible rate, BTC is all over the place, which is bad.
One important use money is to write loan contracts. Loans are great. They let people spend now against their future potential earnings, so they can buy houses or start businesses without first saving up for a decade. Loans are good for the economy.
If you want to sign something that says "I owe you this much for that much time" then you need to be able to roughly predict the value of the debt in at the point in time where it's due.
Otherwise you'll have a hard time pricing the risk of the loan effectively. This means that you need to charge higher interests. The risk of making a loan in BTC needs to be priced into the interest of a BTC-denominated loan, which means much higher interest rates. High interests on loans are bad, because buying houses and starting businesses are good things.

BTC has a fixed supply, so these problems are built in

Some people think that going back to a standard where our money was denominated by a stock of gold (the Gold Standard) would solve economic problems. This is nonsense.
Having control over supply of your currency is a good thing, as long as it's well run.
See here
Remember that what is desirable is low variance in the value, not the value itself. When there are wild fluctuations in value, it's hard for money to do its job well.
Since the 1970s, the USD has been a fiat money with no intrinsic value. This means we control the supply of money.
Let's look at a classic poorly drawn econ101 graph
The market price for USD is where supply meets demand. The problem with a currency based on an item whose supply is fixed is that the price will necessarily fluctuate in response to changes in demand.
Imagine, if you will, that a pandemic strikes and that the demand for currency takes a sharp drop. The US imports less, people don't buy anything anymore, etc. If you can't print money, you get deflation, which is worsens everything. On the other hand, if you can make the money printers go brrrr you can stabilize the price
Having your currency be based on a fixed supply isn't just bad because in/deflation is hard to control.
It's also a national security risk...
The story of the guy who crashed gold prices in North Africa
In the 1200s, Mansa Munsa, the emperor of the Mali, was rich and a devout Muslim and wanted everyone to know it. So he embarked on a pilgrimage to make it rain all the way to Mecca.
He in fact made it rain so hard he increased the overall supply of gold and unintentionally crashed gold prices in Cairo by 20%, wreaking an economic havoc in North Africa that lasted a decade.
This story is fun, the larger point that having your inflation be at the mercy of foreign nations is an undesirable attribute in any currency. The US likes to call some countries currency manipulators, but this problem would be serious under a gold standard.

Currencies are based on trust

Since the USD is based on nothing except the US government's word, how can we trust USD not to be mismanaged?
The answer is that you can probably trust the fed until political stooges get put in place. Currently, the US's central bank managing the USD, the Federal Reserve (the Fed for friends & family), has administrative authority. The fed can say "no" to dumb requests from the president.
People who have no idea what the fed does like to chant "audit the fed", but the fed is already one of the best audited US federal entities. The transcripts of all their meetings are out in the open. As is their balance sheet, what they plan to do and why. If the US should audit anything it's the Department of Defense which operates without any accounting at all.
It's easy to see when a central bank will go rogue: it's when political yes-men are elected to the board.
For example, before printing themselves into hyperinflation, the Venezuelan president appointed a sociologist who publicly stated “Inflation does not exist in real life” and instead is a made up capitalist lie. Note what happened mere months after his gaining control over the Venezuelan currency
This is a key policy. One paper I really like, Sargent (1984) "The end of 4 big inflations" states:
The essential measures that ended hyperinflation in each of Germany,Austria, Hungary, and Poland were, first, the creation of an independentcentral bank that was legally committed to refuse the government'sdemand or additional unsecured credit and, second, a simultaneousalteration in the fiscal policy regime.
In english: *hyperinflation stops when the central bank can say "no" to the government."
The US Fed, like other well good central banks, is run by a bunch of nerds. When it prints money, even as aggressively as it has it does so for good reasons. You can see why they started printing on March 15th as the COVID lockdowns started:
The Federal Reserve is prepared to use its full range of tools to support the flow of credit to households and businesses and thereby promote its maximum employment and price stability goals.
In english: We're going to keep printing and lowering rates until jobs are back and inflation is under control. If we print until the sun is blotted out, we'll print in the shade.

BTC is not gold

Gold is a good asset for doomsday-preppers. If society crashes, gold will still have value.
How do we know that?
Gold has held value throughout multiple historic catastrophes over thousands of years. It had value before and after the Bronze Age Collapse, the Fall of the Western Roman Empire and Gengis Khan being Gengis Khan.
Even if you erased humanity and started over, the new humans would still find gold to be economically valuable. When Europeans d̶i̶s̶c̶o̶v̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ c̶o̶n̶q̶u̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ g̶e̶n̶o̶c̶i̶d̶e̶d̶ went to America, they found gold to be an important item over there too. This is about equivalent to finding humans on Alpha-Centauri and learning that they think gold is a good store of value as well.
Some people are puzzled at this: we don't even use gold for much! But it has great properties:
First, gold is hard to fake and impossible to manufacture. This makes it good to ascertain payment.
Second, gold doesnt react to oxygen, so it doesn't rust or tarnish. So it keeps value over time unlike most other materials.
Last, gold is pretty. This might sound frivolous, and you may not like it, but jewelry has actual value to humans.
It's no coincidence if you look at a list of the wealthiest families, a large number of them trade in luxury goods.
To paraphrase Veblen humans have a profound desire to signal social status, for the same reason peacocks have unwieldy tails. Gold is a great way to achieve that.
On the other hand, BTC lacks all these attributes. Its value is largely based on common perception of value. There are a few fundamental drivers of demand:
Apart from these, it's hard to argue that BTC will retain value throughout some sort of economic catastrophe.

BTC is really risky

One last statement from Michael Saylor I take offense to is this:
“We feel pretty confident that Bitcoin is less risky than holding cash, less risky than holding gold,” MicroStrategy CEO said in an interview
"BTC is less risky than holding cash or gold long term" is nonsense. We saw before that BTC is more volatile on face value, and that as long as the Fed isn't run by spider monkeys stacked in a trench coat, the inflation is likely to be within reasonable bounds.
But on top of this, BTC has Abrupt downside risks that normal currencies don't. Let's imagine a few:

Blockchain solutions are fundamentally inefficient

Blockchain was a genius idea. I still marvel at the initial white paper which is a great mix of economics and computer science.
That said, blockchain solutions make large tradeoffs in design because they assume almost no trust between parties. This leads to intentionally wasteful designs on a massive scale.
The main problem is that all transactions have to be validated by expensive computational operations and double checked by multiple parties. This means waste:
Many design problems can be mitigated by various improvements over BTC, but it remains that a simple database always works better than a blockchain if you can trust the parties to the transaction.
submitted by VodkaHaze to badeconomics [link] [comments]

US OFAC issues advisory: ransom payments for ransomware may involve felony charges and personal civil liability for staff.

Relevant Excerpt:
Under the authority of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) or the Trading with the Enemy Act (TWEA),9 U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions, directly or indirectly, with individuals or entities (“persons”) on OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (SDN List), other blocked persons, and those covered by comprehensive country or region embargoes (e.g., Cuba, the Crimea region of Ukraine, Iran, North Korea, and Syria). Additionally, any transaction that causes a violation under IEEPA, including transactions by a non-U.S. person which causes a U.S. person to violate any IEEPA-based sanctions, is also prohibited. U.S. persons, wherever located, are also generally prohibited from facilitating actions of non-U.S. persons, which could not be directly performed by U.S. persons due to U.S. sanctions regulations. OFAC may impose civil penalties for sanctions violations based on strict liability, meaning that a person subject to U.S. jurisdiction may be held civilly liable even if it did not know or have reason to know it was engaging in a transaction with a person that is prohibited under sanctions laws and regulations administered by OFAC.
Sauce Here: https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/126/ofac_ransomware_advisory_10012020_1.pdf
OFAC Sanctions list here: https://sanctionssearch.ofac.treas.gov/
Analysis: Both TWEA and IEEPA carries Criminal and Civil penalties, so under these acts they can fine the company, fine staff directly, or press criminal charges. We know the US Government as part of both the 5 eyes agreements and domestic bank monitoring programs under FACTA monitors all international wire transfers. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies generally leave a paper trail that can be traced back to who purchased the currency.
What I expect to start happening here is most CFO's are going to write off the cost of the ransom as a tax deduction which tips off the IRS that a ransom of some kind was paid. I expect the next step is the IRS is going to start asking for additional proof of payment and additional information about the cases. That puts CFO's in a bind, because I expect both the IRS, and federal courts, won't let it fly that you didn't know who you were paying money to under the TWEA. They'll sit on the data, and when eventually an APT Group gets compromised, they'll trace the payments back via said tax records. At that point, if your org paid under this, that data gets used to open up a search warrant and then they rip you a new one especially if the payment was substantial.
The bigger issue here is it opens up tremendous liability for security services firms and insurers who pay ransoms on behalf of clients or advise clients to pay ransoms.
Now is a good time to review your backup strategy and ensure you have tested backups that are isolated from your infrastructure.
For those of you with your hands tied behind your back, now is a good time to gently remind your management staff, and especially the CFO if you have their ear, that they cannot rely on the renound cryptographic competence of our eastern european bretheren, and that their worst-case risk is a determined remote attacker and adversary of the US infecting your network, destroying the data while making it look like a ransomware attack, selling you worthless encryption keys to fund their operation before flaunting the fact they took you for a fool with a press release taking credit for the attack to tip off state government you paid them in order to further disrupt the company operations via putting your talented technical staff or c-suite staff in handcuffs and injuring your PR.
To those of you in the business who are afraid of being scapegoated or in a tenuous situation, getchu some evidence tape and some tags, some vanilla envelopes and a glue stick. Print 2 copies, put one copy in a folder, seal it with evidence tape and a tag, then use your handy glue stick to adhere the other vanilla folder to its back and put the 2nd copy in so you can review the paperwork without breaking the evidence seal and shove that sucker in a fire proof safe or safety deposit box. Also, Mailstore home is free.
TL;DR: If your company is attacked by ransomware, tell the management only facts of the occurance you know, what you can and cannot do for them, and don't advise them of anything upto and including getting a security services firm involved. I wouldn't even tell them paying the ransom might work. If you're going to have a verbal conversation, make it a one-on-one.
Happy Saturday all!
submitted by JohnWickBOFH to sysadmin [link] [comments]

[Guide] How can I buy stuff online in Lebanon?

Can I use the old USD in the bank (lollars) to buy online?

Most banks have very low internet limits. We're talking about $15-$20 per month limit. It is expected that all banks decrease this limit to 0 soon.
That being said, banks are not treating customers equally. You might have a better internet limit than other people. Call your bank's call center and ask about your internet limit.

Can I use my LBP card to pay online?

Banks stopped all fx transactions (changing from LBP to USD). So the answer to this question is 99% of the time no.
That being said, banks are not treating customers equally. You might have a better internet limit than other people. Call your bank's call center and ask about your internet limit.

Amazon/Expedia/Steam/Other website is showing the items in LBP and the invoice and total are in LBP, can I use my LBP to pay it?

No. Amazon and other websites show their invoices in all currencies around the world depending on where you're opening the website from. They only accept USD. When you click to purchase, Amazon will attempt to bill your card in USD. Your bank will refuse to exchange from LBP to USD and the payment will be declined.

How can I purchase stuff online?

Fresh USD Account
Blom Bank: https://www.blomretail.com/retail/bank-accounts-lebanon/fresh-money-accounts
Bank Audi: https://www.bankaudi.com.lb/externalaccount
Byblos Bank: https://www.byblosbank.com/personal/accounts/current/
Fresh Money Account or External Account is a bank account that has real USD, unlike old/regular bank accounts which have lollars in them. (Lollars are Lebanese Dollars aka Dollars stuck in Lebanese banks, aka Dollars in bank accounts before October 2019)
Open a fresh USD account in your bank and request a debit card for internet usage from this account. You can use this new debit card to pay online. Basically you go to the bank and give them cash USD and they allow you to use the same amount online.
Internet Cards
Blom has Visa Mini prepaid card.
Anyone can request this internet card, you don't need to have an account with the bank to take it. The card costs $10 annually. Basically you go to the bank or ATM and give them cash USD and they allow you to use the same amount online.
Open a bank account abroad
You can open a bank account in another country and request a debit card and use it without limitations.
You can use online banking services such as Transferwise
You can use Bitcoins
You can purchase bitcoins locally using LBP or USD and use them to buy stuff online.
How to pay for Air Tickets, Netflix, Steam, VPN, and other services using Bitcoin in Lebanon
Gift Cards
Contact gaming stores such as
OLX and similar apps:
Lebanese Businesses that accept cash here and buy from online websites:
EDIT: Adding things mentioned by users in the comment section
submitted by ThePerito to lebanon [link] [comments]

A word of caution about exchanges, privacy and your permanent history on the blockchain

I had an account restricted on a major exchange this year and it's not a pleasant experience. Just wanted to share my experience, since I see so many have been through something similar in several exchange-related subreddits. My case happened at Bittrex but I think it's important to note that this may happen on any exchange, not just Bittrex. People are depositing way too much trust in these exchanges and it may come back to bite them. Here's my experience as honestly as I'm able to put it. Bittrex is technically great, contrary to what many say the system just works. Works great in fact, fast and very few glitches in many many years. I think I must've been a very early customer back when things were very informal and until 2020 I had absolutely zero problems with Bittrex. I always thought they were above the pack when it came to system security design and reliability. Despite joining when it was very early, I did full KYC and had the top tier withdrawal limit even though KYC wasn't obligatory back when I joined. I did it all formally because I wanted to have a sort of bank account I could trust, I didn't want to be jumping from exchange to exchange like some crypto traders did. I never used as much as 0.01% of this withdrawal limit, I'm small fish but it was nice to know I could move tons of BTC like the whales if I ever needed to. So I sent them all my real data, work address and so forth. Then Bittrex got moved out of USA and into some country, don't know where. Which was fine by me, I thought it was the same people behind it, doing some formality. Then one day a person with a drawing for a profile pic and some strange username decides to contact me out of nowhere using the Bittrex tech support interface. They know everything about me, but I don't know anything about them. No contact info visible, nothing. This support person sends you a statement you must sign and then based on that they begin to ask for specific documents. I wanted to keep my relationship with Bittrex, so I filled signed and returned it. Then they dived into each item in the thing requesting more documents based on each. So if you said you previously worked for ACME, they'll ask to see ACME related stuff. I said I bought Bitcoin using Bank X, so they wanted to see Bank X statements. And so on. They begin to dig into each specific item you inform. Then it downed on me that maybe I was under some formal audit, in which case I'd have the right to know so I could hire an accountant or lawyer. So I politely asked. They don't tell you anything. You don't even know who the person is on the other side, there is no identification at all of who's contacting you. You're sending all your personal informations to someone who, as far as you know, could be a cat or a dog typing on a random keyboard. So I then asked them why so much detail was needed, since I'd provided lots already. They ignore and just say thank you for your cooperation and proceded to ask for more stuff. I said fine let's do this and went along. Then they asked for specific crypto addresses for the tokens I'd used in the past. Like the address of whoever sent me some XXXX token years ago. I then thought hey man this is too much, do you need me to fax or mail you my ID or something, I'd do it but whatever I enter in there could spell trouble for me. For example, if some guy whose ETH address did something nasty, but coincidentally paid me years ago using that same address, if I gave them my address from the past, in those several years it could mean this person is now a wanted criminal and it'd spell trouble for me, who knows what the person did afterwards, then my account would be forever linked to that rogue address. I began to reflect on this and thought wait, this is not good, I could put myself into a 'bad address' database for no reason. Then I told them I would not send the crypto addresses. They said thanks let's continue the process. It felt weird overall, it just keeps going and demanding more information. I then asked for someone to speak to or somewhere physical I could go to, to talk and show that I'm a real person, they never reply anything, they just ask for more. So I finally gave up and stopped replying and they apparently restricted my account or something. I'll have to go back and reopen the ticket and request account reactivation but then they'll probably restart the same process again. I'm not really that much of a fan of crypto these days, so I'm thinking maybe it's time to call it quits. The reason I'm writing this is to let everyone know that whatever you do in crypto gets forever linked to you. You begin thinking it's some informal thing and that there's some freedom but there really isn't. You may fool around with crypto but then someone is recording everything and will demand you make everything formal in the future. When I joined Bittrex everything was more informal in crypto, even shapeshift and others allowed you to trade crypto with no ID at all, 100% anonymous. Heck even faucets gave out free Bitcoin back in the day. Then all of a sudden everything you do in these exchanges will be audited and you'll need to provide formal documents for everything you did in the past 10 years. Some anonymous operator (this isn't specific to Bittrex, all of them do it that way) with no office has all your info but you know nothing about them in return. You don't even know where these exchanges are located at all. I saw a Facebook post about Binance not even having a formal country, they're "all over t he place". Sure that sounds cool but...who do you turn to when they demand legal stuff from you? Someone out there has all your financial information but you have nothing, you have no security, no legal protection, nothing and they have everything. So, be careful. This isn't all specific to Bittrex, any exchange can and probably will do the same. Point is crypto is a formal thing and will spell trouble for you in the future. Especially since blockchain analysis is way too primitive still, your addresses could somehow end up in a bad neightborhood. The pandemic kinda reminded me of blockchain transactions, you may end up infected because you have no way to know what others have been doing while you were doing everything right.
submitted by cromozomesten to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Nine Countries That Don’t Tax Bitcoin Gains- time to move

Tax liability is a major source of concern for anyone invested in Bitcoin and other digital assets. In sum, some have described it as nothing short of a nightmare.
But while some countries are putting pressure on investors and levying taxes on income and capital gains from Bitcoin transactions, many are taking a different approach—often with the aim of promoting better adoption and innovation within the crypto industry. They’ve implemented friendlier legislation, and allow investors to buy, sell, or hold digital assets with no tax liability.
Here’s our list of the nine most crypto-friendly tax jurisdictions.
———————
  1. Belarus 🇧🇾
Belarus is taking an experimental approach to cryptocurrencies. In March 2018, a new law legalized cryptocurrency activities in the East European state, exempting individuals and businesses involved in them from taxes until 2023 (when it will come up for review.)
Under the law, mining and investing in cryptocurrencies are deemed personal investments, and so exempt from income tax and capital gains.
The liberal laws aim to boost the development of a digital economy, and technological innovation. The country was recently ranked third in Eastern Europe and 19th globally in levels of P2P crypto trading.
  1. Germany 🇩🇪
Germany offers a unique take on taxing digital currencies such as Bitcoin. Unlike most other states, Europe’s biggest economy regards Bitcoin as private money, as opposed to a currency, commodity, or stock.
For German residents, any cryptocurrency held for over a year is tax-exempt, regardless of the amount. If the assets are held for less than a year, capital gains tax doesn’t accrue on a sale, as long as the amount does not exceed 600 euros ($692).
However, for businesses it’s a different matter; a startup incorporated in Germany still needs to pay corporate income taxes on cryptocurrency gains, just as it would with any other asset.
  1. Hong Kong 🇭🇰
Hong Kong’s tax legislation on cryptocurrencies is a broad brush affair, even after new guidance was issued earlier this year.
Essentially, whether cryptocurrencies are taxed or not depends on their use, according to Henri Arslanian, a global crypto leader at PwC.
“If digital assets are bought for long-term investment purposes, any profits from disposal would not be chargeable to profits tax,” he wrote in March when the directive was introduced. But he added that this doesn’t apply to corporations—their Hong-Kong sourced profits from cryptocurrency business activities are taxable.
  1. Malaysia 🇲🇾
In Malaysia, cryptocurrency transactions are currently tax-free, and cryptocurrencies don’t qualify for capital gains tax, because digital currencies are not considered assets or legal tender by the authorities.
But the law is currently fluid; it only applies to individual taxpayers, and businesses involved in cryptocurrency are subject to Malaysian income tax.
And things may soon change. Mohamad Fauzi Saat, director of Malaysia’s tax department said in 2018 that Malaysia was committed to working towards issuing comprehensive guidelines on the tax treatment of cryptocurrency by the end of 2020.
  1. Malta 🇲🇹
The government of the so-called “Blockchain Island” recognizes Bitcoin “as a unit of account, medium of exchange, or a store of value.”
Malta doesn’t apply capital gains tax to long-held digital currencies like Bitcoin, but crypto trades are considered similar to day trading in stocks or shares, and attract business income tax at the rate of 35%. However, this can be mitigated to between five percent and zero, through “structuring options” available under the Maltese system.
Malta’s fiscal guidelines, published in 2018, also discriminate between Bitcoin and so-called “financial tokens,” equivalent to dividends, interest or premiums. The latter are treated as income and taxed at the applicable rate.
  1. Portugal 🇵🇹
Portugal has one of the most crypto-friendly tax regimes in the world.
Proceeds from the sale of cryptocurrencies by individuals have been tax-exempt since 2018, and cryptocurrency trading is not considered investment income (which is normally subject to a 28% tax rate.)
However, businesses that accept digital currencies as payment for goods and services are liable to income tax.
  1. Singapore 🇸🇬
Capital gains tax does not exist in Singapore, so neither individuals nor corporations holding cryptocurrency are liable.
But companies based in Singapore are liable to income tax, if their core business is cryptocurrency trading, or if they accept cryptocurrency as payment.
The authorities consider payment tokens such as Bitcoin to be “intangible property” rather than legal tender, and payment in the cryptocurrency constitutes a “barter trade” where the goods and services are taxed, but not the payment token itself.
  1. Slovenia 🇸🇮
Slovenia is another country that treats individuals and businesses separately under its cryptocurrency tax system.
No capital gains tax is levied on individuals when they sell Bitcoin, and gains are not considered income. However, companies that receive payment in cryptocurrencies, or through mining, are required to pay tax at the corporate rate.
Notably, the Mediterranean country doesn’t permit business operations in cryptocurrency alone (such as only accepting Bitcoin as payment.)
  1. Switzerland 🇨🇭
It’s no surprise that Switzerland, home to the innovation hub known as “Crypto Valley”, has one of the most forward-thinking tax policies too.
Cryptocurrency profits made by a qualified individual through investing and trading are treated as tax-exempt capital gains.
For the complete link to the written article - click here
Edit: hey thanks for the award, that was so awesome. Have a nice day everyone.
submitted by girlshero to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

China is a threat to bitcoin?

I understand that 51% Attack is very costly and probably won't probably much financial incentive to the one who orchestrates it. I came across this blog post called How China can kill bitcoin and thought that the author does have quite a good point (despite the tone of the blog post). He argued that the top 4 Chinese mining pools alone represent more than 51% of the hashrate and if the Chinese government are to forcibly commandeer these top 4 mining pools (without having to buy new mining equipment) then they can easily orchestrate the 51% attack within an hour and a double-spend would have been successful.
A few questions:
  1. If this all is true, wouldn't you say that China is quite a big threat to the existence of bitcoin? Isn't this something we should be more worried about? (it seems that most of bitcoin community just assumed that no one will attempt the 51% attack and it has been debunked many times). I don't know what could be the incentives for China to do this (cracking down money laundering?) but does the fact that they could do this if they want to concern you?
  2. Will bitcoin mining be more decentralized (esp away from China) in the future? It seems that miners should go wherever there is cheap electricity, why haven't more countries jumped in?
  3. Can anyone comment about Stratum V2? Will it help address the problem by giving the control to miners o select their own transaction sets? When will it be ready?
submitted by stackingsatseveryday to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Blockchain and the future of financial services ( just to jog your memory )


Blockchain can add value to today's economy and financial systems, complementing and enhancing financial services in the new digital age
Countless studies and research conducted to date indicate that blockchain technology has extraordinary potential to transform our world, and of course, the financial services that we enjoy today.
In fact, blockchain technology, which was born together with Bitcoin in 2009, has quite practical use cases and applications that simplify many of the processes of the conventional financial system, providing greater confidence and efficiency to this industry. And although blockchain technology is not only useful within the economy or finance, it is this sector where we will focus in this article, to know the future of financial services.
We are in an increasingly globalized world, which causes, in the economic sphere, that every day more countries are integrated into technological developments, innovation, trade and international flows. Cross-border payments and international business transactions are a reality almost globally today. Interaction between people, businesses, and governments has been greatly facilitated by this process. However, there are still many practices and processes that are imposed as barriers that prevent current financial services from working for everyone
submitted by gregoricordova to revain_org [link] [comments]

Why Bitcoin is Superior to Gold

There is a constant war being fought between goldbugs, like Peter Schiff, and Bitcoin enthusiasts so I decided to make an outline, with links, comparing and contrasting gold and Bitcoin. I made this in November of 2019 (thus the information therein is based on figures from that time) but, being scatter brained, neglected to post this for the Bitcoin community to see. The yardsticks I used to compare the two assets included the following: shipping/transactions costs, storage costs, censorship factor, settlement time, stock to flow, blockchain vs clearing house, validation, etc. I will also touch on Roosevelt's gold confiscation executive order in 1933, transporting gold during the Spanish Civil War in 1936, and the hypothetical cost for Venezuela to repatriate its gold more recently.
I will provide a brief summary first then follow that with the outline I made. This information can be used as a tool for the Bitcoin community to combat some of the silly rhetoric coming from goldbugs such as Peter Schiff and James Rickards. I would like to make it clear, however, that I am not against gold and think that it performed its role as money very well in a technologically inferior era, namely Victorian times but I think Bitcoin performs the functions of money better than gold does in the current environment.
I have been looking to make a contribution to the Bitcoin community and I hope this is a useful and educational tool for everyone who reads this.
Summary:
Shipping/transaction costs: 100 ounces of gold could be shipped for 315 dollars; the comparable dollar value in Bitcoin could be sent for 35 dollars using a non-segwit address. Using historical precendent, it would cost an estimated $32,997,989 to transport $1 billion in gold using the 3.3% fee that the Soviets charged the Spaniards in 1936; a $1 billion Bitcoin transaction moved for $690 last year by comparison. Please note that the only historic example we can provide for moving enormous sums of gold was when the government of Spain transported gold to Moscow during the Spanish Civil War in 1936. More information on this topic will be found in the notes section.
Storage costs: 100 ounces of gold would require $451 per year to custody while the equivalent value of Bitcoin in dollar terms could be stored for the cost of a Ledger Nano S, $59.99. $1 billion USD value of gold would cost $2,900,000 per year while an Armory set up that is more secure would run you the cost of a laptop, $200-300.
Censorship factor: Gold must pass through a 3rd party whenever it is shipped, whether for a transaction or for personal transportation. Gold will typically have to be declared and a customs duty may be imposed when crossing international borders. The key take-away is gatekeepers (customs) can halt movement of gold thus making transactions difficult. $46,000 of gold was seized in India despite the smugglers hiding it in their rectums.
Settlement time: Shipping gold based on 100 ounces takes anywhere from 3-10 days while Bitcoin transactions clear in roughly 10 minutes depending on network congestion and fee size.
Historic confiscation: Franklin Roosevelt confiscated and debased the paper value of gold in 1933 with Executive Order 6102. Since gold is physical in nature and value dense, it is often stored in custodial vaults like banks and so forth which act as a honeypot for rapacious governments.
Stock to flow: Plan B's stock to flow model has become a favorite on twitter. Stock to flow measures the relationship between the total stock of an asset against the amount that is produced in a given year. Currently gold still has the highest value at 62 while Bitcoin sits at 50 in 2nd place. Bitcoin will overtake gold in 2024 after the next halving.
Blockchain vs clearing house: gold payments historically passed through a 3rd party (clearinghouse) in order to be validated while Bitcoin transactions can be self validated through the use of a node.
Key Takeaway from above- Bitcoin is vastly superior to gold in terms of cost, speed, and censorship resistance. One could theoretically carry around an enormous sum of Bitcoin on a cold card while the equivalent dollar value of gold would require a wheelbarrow...and create an enormous target on the back of the transporter. With the exception of the stock to flow ratio (which will flip in Bitcoin's favor soon), Bitcoin is superior to gold by all metrics covered.
Notes:
Shipping/transaction costs
Gold
100 oz = 155,500. 45 x 7 = $315 to ship 100 oz gold.
https://seekingalpha.com/instablog/839735-katchum/2547831-how-much-does-it-cost-to-ship-silver-and-gold
https://www.coininvest.com/en/shipping-prices/
211 tonnes Venezuela; 3.3% of $10.5 billion = 346,478,880 or 32,997,989/billion usd
http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/08/23/how-to-get-12-billion-of-gold-to-venezuela/ (counter party risk; maduro; quotes from article)
Bitcoin
18 bitcoin equivalent value; 35 USD with legacy address
https://blockexplorer.com/
https://bitcoinfees.info/
1 billion; $690 dollars
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/09/someone-moved-1-billion-in-a-single-bitcoin-transaction/
Storage costs
Gold
.29% annually; https://sdbullion.com/gold-silver-storage
100 oz – $451/year
$1 billion USD value – $2,900,000/year
Bitcoin
Ledger Nano S - $59.00 (for less bitcoin)
https://shop.ledger.com/products/ledger-nano-s/transparent?flow_country=USA&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI3ILV5O-Z5wIVTtbACh1zTAwqEAQYASABEgJ5SPD_BwE
Armory - $200-300 cost of laptop for setup
https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Censorship factor (must pass through 3rd party)
Varies by country
Gold will typically have to be declared and a customs duty may be imposed
Key take-away is gatekeepers (customs) can halt movement of gold thus making transactions difficult
$46,000 seized in India
https://www.foxnews.com/travel/indian-airport-stops-29-passengers-smuggling-gold-in-their-rectums
Settlement time
Gold
For 100 oz transaction by USPS 3-10 days (must pass through 3rd party)
Bitcoin
Roughly 10 minutes to be included in next block
Historic confiscation-roosevelt 1933
Executive Order 6102 (forced spending, fed could ban cash, go through and get quotes)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_6102
“The stated reason for the order was that hard times had caused "hoarding" of gold, stalling economic growth and making the depression worse”
Stock to flow; https://medium.com/@100trillionUSD/modeling-bitcoins-value-with-scarcity-91fa0fc03e25 (explain what it is and use charts in article)
Gold; SF of 62
Bitcoin; SF of 25 but will double to 50 after May (and to 100 in four years)
Blockchain vs clearing house
Transactions can be validated by running a full node vs. third party settlement
Validation
Gold; https://www.goldismoney2.com/threads/cost-to-assay.6732/
(Read some responses)
Bitcoin
Cost of electricity to run a full node
Breaking down Venezuela conundrum; http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/2011/08/23/how-to-get-12-billion-of-gold-to-venezuela/
“The last (and only) known case of this kind of quantity of gold being transported across state lines took place almost exactly 75 years ago, in 1936, when the government of Spain removed 560 tons of gold from Madrid to Moscow as the armies of Francisco Franco approached. Most of the gold was exchanged for Russian weaponry, with the Soviet Union keeping 2.1% of the funds in the form of commissions and brokerage, and an additional 1.2% in the form of transport, deposit, melting, and refining expenses.”
“Venezuela would need to transport the gold in several trips, traders said, since the high value of gold means it would be impossible to insure a single aircraft carrying 211 tonnes. It could take about 40 shipments to move the gold back to Caracas, traders estimated. “It’s going to be quite a task. Logistically, I’m not sure if the central bank realises the magnitude of the task ahead of them,” said one senior gold banker.”
“So maybe Chávez intends to take matters into his own hands, and just sail the booty back to Venezuela on one of his own naval ships. Again, the theft risk is obvious — seamen can be greedy too — and this time there would be no insurance. Chávez is pretty crazy, but I don’t think he’d risk $12 billion that way.”
“Which leaves one final alternative. Gold is fungible, and people are actually willing to pay a premium to buy gold which is sitting in the Bank of England’s ultra-secure vaults. So why bother transporting that gold at all? Venezuela could enter into an intercontinental repo transaction, where it sells its gold in the Bank of England to some counterparty, and then promises to buy it all back at a modest discount, on condition that it’s physically delivered to the Venezuelan central bank in Caracas. It would then be up to the counterparty to work out how to get 211 tons of gold to Caracas by a certain date. That gold could be sourced anywhere in the world, and transported in any conceivable manner — being much less predictable and transparent, those shipments would also be much harder to hijack. How much of a discount would a counterparty require to enter into this kind of transaction? Much more than 3.3%, is my guess. And again, it’s not entirely clear who would even be willing to entertain the idea. Glencore, perhaps?”
“But here’s one last idea: why doesn’t Chávez crowdsource the problem? He could simply open a gold window at the Banco Central de Venezuela, where anybody at all could deliver standard gold bars. In return, the central bank would transfer to that person an equal number of gold bars in the custody of the Bank of England, plus a modest bounty of say 2% — that’s over $15,000 per 400-ounce bar, at current rates. It would take a little while, but eventually the gold would start trickling in: if you’re willing to pay a constant premium of 2% over the market price for a good, you can be sure that the good in question will ultimately find its way to your door. And the 2% cost of acquiring all that gold would surely be much lower than the cost of insuring and shipping it from England. It would be an elegant market-based solution to an artificial and ideologically-driven problem; I daresay Chávez might even chuckle at the irony of it. He’d just need to watch out for a rise in Andean banditry, as thieves tried to steal the bars on their disparate journeys into Venezuela.”
submitted by cornish_roots to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hypothetical. I want to send funds to the Kurdish republic of Rojava in Syria to support them during this crisis of theirs, the only way I can do this is through bitcoin (or other crypto).

So what the title says.
Lets say I want to support Rojava because they are one of the few bastions in Syria which is actually secular, liberal and democratic.
I've done so regularly in the past through traditional channels (which has cost a lot of money in fees) and it has worked well.
So this was allowed through traditional means untill Turkey, under americas allowance, invaded their terroritory and forced Rojava to align itself with the syrian government/former government in order to be able to defend themselves against the Turkey army that consider them to be terrorists because they happen to be kurds that have regional autonomy and means to defend themselves. (this is btw after america gave Rojava their guarantee that america would defend the kurds against Turkey if it came to that, in exchange for Rojava dismantling their turkey-facing defensive structures)
From now on, depending on your domiciled country, many westerners can no longer financially support Rojava because of an ocean or reasons. For some its that you're not allowed to financially support states that are in armed conflict with an ally (Turkey is in NATO), for others its that you're not allowed to financially support organisations that cooperate with Assad (nevermind that it was america that put them in the position that they had to), and there is a host of others.
Now how can I support Rojava in any other way than through bitcoin/other crypto?
I've looked it up, it does indeed work and they have bitcoin addresses one can donate too. (as I understand it they even have specified addresses if you want to donate to some specific section, like if you specifically want to support child healthcare)
Now could you please tell me of another comparable or better way to donate to this cause, other than through crypto?
I cant wire it or in any way use banking, its simply not possible due to regs.
I cant send money in the mail because mail delivery over that distance and into syrian territory is spotty at best and if the letter is taken by another group then I've inadvertedly supported what is likely a islamic fundamentalist militia. I also know crypto fees is a big joke in here but the fees to send letters to syria dwarf any crypto transaction fee. (not to mention the fucking headache, I struggle sending packages to the next country over, cant even begin to consider everything that I'll need to do to send something to Syria)
Please let me know how I'm wrong in that this is the best and potentially only way of doing this.
Further let me know how crypto still doesnt have a use case if you agree that I'm right on this.
(Hey mister FBI-guy, if you're reading this I just want it clear that I'm making a hypothetical here. I wouldnt send a cent to godless socialists in the middle east, I'm just a normal american that watches football and boo at the blacks when they kneel, not an ounce of unamerican-ness in my body)
submitted by MJURICAN to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

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